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Memoir

Theodore Mead Newcomb
Regents' Proceedings 1010

Theodore M. Newcomb, Mary Ann and Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. Professor for the Study of Human Understanding, Professor of Psychology and Sociology, and Associate Director of the Residential College, is concluding a career as one of the foremost social psychologists in the nation.

A native of Rock Creek, Ohio, he obtained his A.B. degree from Oberlin College in 1924 and his Ph.D. degree from Columbia in 1929. Prior to his appointment as Associate Professor of Sociology at the University in 1941, Professor Newcomb held teaching assignments at Lehigh University, 1929-30, Western Reserve University, 1930-34, and Bennington College, 1934-41.

He was elevated to full professor at the University in 1946. Since that time he has held responsibilities as Research Associate and Program Director with the Institute for Social Research, and Research Social Psychologist with the Mental Health Research Institute. For sixteen years he headed the doctoral program in social psychology.

It is literally impossible to include here even a listing of the achievements and distinctions that have accrued to this dedicated scholar. His investigations in interpersonal behavior and attitude change, his writings and inspirations as a teacher have prompted honors and recognition from students and colleagues alike. He has headed national professional organizations, been called on continuously as an international consultant, and received major professional awards including his recent election to the National Academy of Sciences.

His contributions to the University have been far above average and have included service on the college executive committee, assistance in developing the Residential College and serving as its Associate Director, and aiding in the development of the Pilot Program. He has in turn been recognized for his efforts as a recipient of a Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award and finally by being named the first appointee to the Walgreen Professorship in Human Understanding.

The Regents join colleagues the world over in celebrating his accomplishments as they name him Mary Ann and Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. Professor Emeritus for the Study of Human Understanding, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Sociology, and Associate Director Emeritus of the Residential College.