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Memoir

Gerard A. Mourou
Regents' Proceedings 178

Gerard A. Mourou, Ph.D., A.D. Moore Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and director of the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science in the College of Engineering, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 2004.

Professor Mourou received his B.S. degree from the University of Grenoble (1967), his M.S. degree from the University of Orsay (1970), and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Paris VII (1973). Following postdoctoral research at San Diego State University, he served at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris (1974-77) and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester (1977-88). He joined the University of Michigan faculty as a professor in 1988 and was appointed the A.D. Moore Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1996.

Professor Mourou has brought great distinction to the University through his outstanding achievements in research and scientific leadership. In 1991, he founded the Ultrafast Science Laboratory (now the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS)), and he has directed the center since its inception. Under Professor Mourou's direction, CUOS has been at the forefront of many fields, such as ultrafast and high-peak power lasers, ultrafast solid-state physics and electronics, and chemical dynamics, and the center has provided students with unparalleled research experiences. His research groups made significant contributions to the field and introduced several powerful techniques such as chirped pulse amplification, which revolutionized the field of laser-matter interaction.

Among Professor Mourou's numerous awards and recognitions are the R.W. Wood Prize, the Harold E. Edgerton Award, the IEEE D. Sarnoff Award, the IEEE/LEOS Quantum Electronics Award, and the University's Henry Russel Lectureship. He is a Fellow of IEEE and the Optical Society of America and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Regents salute this distinguished scholar by naming Gerard A. Mourou the Arthur D. Moore Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and professor emeritus of electrical engineering and computer science.

Regents’ Proceedings, December 2004, Page 178