The Faculty History Project documents faculty members who have been associated with the University of Michigan since 1837. Key in this effort is to celebrate the intellectual life of the University. This Faculty History Website is intended as a component of the effort to document the extraordinary academic achievements of Michigan’s faculty in building and sustaining one of the world’s great universities. It provides access to a comprehensive database of information concerning the thousands of faculty members who have served the University of Michigan.
Find out more.

The Bentley Historical Library serves as the official archives for the University.

Bio

Elaine Grace Polsten Rockwood
School of Nursing

Elaine Grace Polsten Rockwood, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing and Assistant Supervisor of Psychiatric Nursing, Veterans Readjustment Center

Diploma, Hartford Hospital School of Nursing, Hartford, Connecticut, 1951; B.S., Boston University School of Nursing; M.S. in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Delaware.

Instructor, Connecticut State Hospital, Middletown, Connecticut, 1951-52; Instructor in Nursing, University of Michigan School of Nursing, and Assistant Supervisor of Psychiatric Nursing, Veterans Readjustment Center, 1955-1956; Instructor in Nursing and Assistant Supervisor of Psychiatric Nursing, Neuropsychiatric Institute, Veterans Readjustment Center, and Children’s Psychiatric Hospital, 1956-1957; Associate Professor Emerita, College of Nursing, University of Delaware.

Elaine Grace Polsten, of Farmington, Connecticut, was married to Horace Seymour Rockwood III, who became an English professor, and then to Dr. F. Peter Boettcher, a research chemist, both of whom were connected to the University of Michigan. As Elaine Boettcher, then assistant professor of nursing at University of Delaware, she wrote an article titled “Preventing Violent Behavior: An Integrated Theoretical Model for Nursing” which appeared in Perspectives in Psychiatric Care (April 1983). Her master’s thesis at University of Delaware was called “The Influence of Selected Nursing Interventions on Verbal Expressions of Self-Aggression by Patients in Brief Psychotherapy.”